Comprehension


Direction: In the following questions, you have brief passages with 5/10 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE
We all know that Eskimos have 50 different words for ‘snow’. Or is it 500 ? Anyway, an awful lot. It is one of those interesting little facts that says something about the amazing ingenuity of humans. Whereas we see snow, the Eskimos perceive an endlessly varying realm of white textures and possibilities. Except that is not true. Talk to the average Eskimo and you’ll find he has about the same number of words for snow as we do. I discovered this when I took a sledge-dog team through the Russian Arctic and asked the locals. And it gets worse: the Eskimo-Inuit do not live in igloos. They do not even rub their noses together! Hearing this I began wondering what other myths surround the world’s far-flung places. Shelters made out of snow are indeed constructed and fashioned from snowy bricks, just as we like to imagine. Except the Eskimo-Inuit rarely lived in them for long periods and disappointingly, the elders that I met had never heard of them. In truth, these are coastal people who traditionally foraged for driftwood, whalebones, stones and turf to construct their camps, saving snow-houses for hunting excursions or migrations. Chameleons also attract numerous myths. While many of them change colour, this is often less to do with camouflage and more to do with their mood and temperature. A chameleon might, if too cold, turn a darker shade to absorb more heat. Or it might turn a lighter colour to reflect the sun and so cool down. Moreover, chameleons often change colour as a signalling device -some such as the panther chameleon, transform into a vivid orange to scare off predators, while others flash bright colours to attract a mate. The brighter the colour a mate is able to display, the more dominant. Thus the act of standing out can be more important than that of blending in.
SOME IMPORTANT WORDS
(1) ingenuity (N.) : the ability to invent things/solve problems in clever, new ways
(2) perceive (V.) : see
(3) realm (N.) : an area
(4) foraged (V.) : to search for something
(5)driftwood (N.) : wood that the sea carries up onto land, or that floats on the water
(6) turf (N.) : short grass and the surface layer of soil that is held together by its roots
(7) camouflage (N.) : the way in which an animal’s colour/shape matches its surroundings and makes it difficult to see
(8) predators (N.) : an animal that kills and eats other animals
(9) stand out (Phr.V.) : to be easily seen
(10) blend in (Phr. V.) : to match well with something

  1. The author was surprised by the fact that









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    the Eskimo-Inuit do not live in igloos

    Correct Option: C

    the Eskimo-Inuit do not live in igloos


Direction: In the following questions, you have brief passages with 5/10 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE
As my train was not due to leave for another hour, I had plenty of time to spare. After buying some magazines to read on the journey, I made my way to the luggage office to collect the heavy suitcase I had left there three days before. There were only a few people waiting, and I took out my wallet to find the receipt for my case. The receipt did not seem to be where I had left it. I emptied the contents of the wallet, and the railway tickets, money, scraps of paper, and photographs tumbled out of it; but no matter how hard I searched, the receipt was nowhere to be found. I explained the situation sorrowfully to the assistant. The man looked at me suspiciously as if to say he had heard this type of story many times and asked me to describe the case. I told him that it was an old, brown looking object no different from the many suitcases I could see on the shelves. The assistant then gave me form and told me to make a list of the contents of the case. If they were correct, he said, I could take the case away. I tried to remember all the articles I had hurriedly packed and wrote them down. After I had done this, I went to look among the shelves. There were hundreds of cases there and for one dreadful moment, it occurred to me that if someone had picked the receipt up, he could easily have claimed the case already. Fortunately this had not happened, for after a time, I found the case lying on its side high up in the corner. After examining the articles inside, the assistant gave me the case. I took out my wallet to pay him. I pulled out a ten shilling note and out slipped my ‘lost’ receipt with it! I could not help blushing. The assistant nodded his head knowingly, as if to say that he had often seen this happen too !!
SOME IMPORTANT WORDS
(1) suspiciously (Adv.) : in a way that shows you think somebody has done something wrong, illegal/ dishonest
(2) dreadful (Adj.) : very bad/unpleasant
(3) flushing (V.) : to become red in the face because you are embarrassed/ashamed

  1. In this passage situation means









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    position

    Correct Option: D

    position



  1. I explained the situation sorrowfully to the assistant means









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    with great distress the writer explained his unfortunate situation to the assistant

    Correct Option: C

    with great distress the writer explained his unfortunate situation to the assistant


  1. The assistant asked the writer to make a list of the contents to









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    ascertain his ownership of the case

    Correct Option: A

    ascertain his ownership of the case



  1. The writer took out his wallet the first time to









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    look for the receipt

    Correct Option: B

    look for the receipt