Comprehension


Direction: In the following questions, you have three passages with 10 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question, out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE
Tagore was a man of extraordinary vision and progressive thinking. Spiritualism and rationalism were reconciled in Tagore. He had the visionary power of seeing the future in the seeds of the present events. In his book ‘Nationalism’, published in 1916. Tagore expressed his concerns about the dangers of religious fanaticism and racism which caused the most destructive wars in the history of the world. He was a seer who foresaw the destructive and dangerous effect of science and technologies on man and nature. Machines, he had predicted, would dominate man and destroy the beauty of nature and fine human qualities. Tagore’s prophecies have, to a great extent, come true. The basic difference between the West and the East was clearly perceived by Tagore. Materialism characterizes the western civilization whereas the east is dominated by spiritualism. Tagore had known and prophesied it. However, he was optimistic of the mutual cultural enrichment through the association between the West and the East. Another important quality of Tagore as a thinker was revealed in his crusade against many superstitious beliefs of the Indians. He spoke out against caste discriminations which divided the Indian society. It required courage, intellectual as well as spiritual, to fight against the age-old customs such as child marriage and casteism. All this was possible because he was a thinker who thought and acted ahead of his own time.

  1. Tagore had the visionary power to see the future in









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    the seeds of the present events

    Correct Option: A

    the seeds of the present events


Direction: In the following questions, you have three passages with 10 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question, out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE
A pilgrimage is, of course, an expedition to some venerated place or a long and wonderful history of human experience in divine matters, or a personal attraction affecting the soul impels one. This is, I say, its essence. But there is something more than to it than mere objective. I will visit the grave of a saint or a man whom I venerate privately for his virtues or deeds, but on the way I may wish to do something a little difficult to show at what price I hold communion with his resting place and also on the way I will see all I can of men and things, delight in the divine that is hidden in everything. Thus I may go with nothing but my clothes and a stick but I must be open-minded and ready to give multitudinous praise to God. A pilgrimage ought to be nothing but a nobler kind of travel, in which, according to our age and inclination, we tell our tale. It is a very great error, and unknown before our most recent corruptions that the religous spirit should be so superficial and self-conscious as to dominate our method of action at special times and to be absent at others. It is better occasionally to travel to some beloved place, haunted by our mission, yet falling into every ordinary levity, than to go about a common voyage on a chastened and devout spirit. There is another kind of pilgrimage which some few sad men undertake to ease a burdened mind. These are exempted from the rule and the adventures of the inns and foreign conversations, broaden their world and lighten their minds. The common sort, however, is a separate and human satisfaction of a need, the realisation of imagined horizons and the reaching of a goal. A pilgrimage however careless, must not be untroublesome. It would be a contradiction of pilgrimage to seek to make the journey short and rapid, merely consuming the mind for nothing, as is our modern habit; for they seem to think nowadays that to remain as near as possible to what one was at starting, and to one’s usual rut, is the great good of travel. The spirit of a pilgrimage is to comprehend the whole way, the people, their habits, the hills and clouds. And as to the method of doing this, we may go bicycling or
driving but the best way is on foot, where one is a man like any other man, with the sky above one and the road beneath and the world on every side and time to see all.

  1. The best way of travelling is









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    walking

    Correct Option: C

    walking


  1. A pilgrimage must be









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    different from one’s usual rut

    Correct Option: D

    different from one’s usual rut


  1. The most common reason for undergoing a pilgrimage is to









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    realize a goal

    Correct Option: B

    realize a goal


  1. The benefit of a pilgrimage is









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    it enlarges one’s world

    Correct Option: A

    it enlarges one’s world