Medieval history miscellaneous


  1. Which dynasty was ruling in Vijaynagar empire at the time of the Battle of Talikota?









  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    The Battle of Talikota was a watershed battle fought between the Vijayanagara Empire and the Deccan sultanates. Sadasiva Raya of Tuluva dynasty was the ruler of Vijayanagara then. Sadasiva Raya was a puppet ruler; the real power was exercised by his minister Rama Raya. The battle ended in the defeat of Vijayanagara, resulting in its subsequent weakening.

    Correct Option: C

    The Battle of Talikota was a watershed battle fought between the Vijayanagara Empire and the Deccan sultanates. Sadasiva Raya of Tuluva dynasty was the ruler of Vijayanagara then. Sadasiva Raya was a puppet ruler; the real power was exercised by his minister Rama Raya. The battle ended in the defeat of Vijayanagara, resulting in its subsequent weakening.


  1. Abdul Fazal was the son of which Sufi saint?









  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Abdul Fazal was the son of Sheikh Mubarak Nagori. Abdul Fazal was the vizier of the Mughal emperor Akbar, and author of the Akbarnama, the official history of Akbar’s reign in three volumes and a Persian translation of the Bible. He was also one of the Nine Jewels (Navaratnas) of Akbar’s royal court and the brother of Faizi, the poet laureate of emperor Akbar.

    Correct Option: A

    Abdul Fazal was the son of Sheikh Mubarak Nagori. Abdul Fazal was the vizier of the Mughal emperor Akbar, and author of the Akbarnama, the official history of Akbar’s reign in three volumes and a Persian translation of the Bible. He was also one of the Nine Jewels (Navaratnas) of Akbar’s royal court and the brother of Faizi, the poet laureate of emperor Akbar.



  1. The foreign traveller who visited India during the reign of Shahjahan was









  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Italian traveller Nicolao Manucci (1653-1708 AD) visited India during the reign of Mughal emperor Shahjahan. Manucci had first-hand knowledge of the Mughal court, and his work “Storia do Mogor” is considered to be the most detailed account of the Mughal court. It is an important account of the time of the later reign of Shah Jahan and of the reign of Aurangzeb.

    Correct Option: D

    Italian traveller Nicolao Manucci (1653-1708 AD) visited India during the reign of Mughal emperor Shahjahan. Manucci had first-hand knowledge of the Mughal court, and his work “Storia do Mogor” is considered to be the most detailed account of the Mughal court. It is an important account of the time of the later reign of Shah Jahan and of the reign of Aurangzeb.


  1. Which monument is known as the “Dream in Stones’?









  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    The Panch Mahal, one of the most famous structures of Fatehpur Sikri, is known as ‘dream in stone’ (Discover with Derek by Derek O’Brien). It was built by Akbar for Mughal women and ladies of the harem. Akbar’s grandson Shahjahan built ‘dream in marble’ (Taj Mahal).

    Correct Option: D

    The Panch Mahal, one of the most famous structures of Fatehpur Sikri, is known as ‘dream in stone’ (Discover with Derek by Derek O’Brien). It was built by Akbar for Mughal women and ladies of the harem. Akbar’s grandson Shahjahan built ‘dream in marble’ (Taj Mahal).



  1. Which among the following foreign countries was the first one to trade with India?









  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Portuguese sailor Vasco da Gama’s discovery of a new sea route to India in 1498 paved the way for European commerce with India. This led to the beginning of trade relations between the two countries. The Portuguese soon set up trading-posts in Goa, Daman, Diu and Bombay. The next to arrive were the Dutch, the British—who set up a trading-post in the west-coast port of Surat in 1619—and the French.

    Correct Option: D

    Portuguese sailor Vasco da Gama’s discovery of a new sea route to India in 1498 paved the way for European commerce with India. This led to the beginning of trade relations between the two countries. The Portuguese soon set up trading-posts in Goa, Daman, Diu and Bombay. The next to arrive were the Dutch, the British—who set up a trading-post in the west-coast port of Surat in 1619—and the French.