Medieval history miscellaneous


  1. The Upanishads were translated by Dara Shikoh in Persian under the title of









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    Dara Shikoh, Emperor Shah Jahan’s son and brother of Aurangzeb, tranlsated the Upanishads into Persian, with the help of several pundits of Banaras. His translation of the Upanishads is appropriately called Sirr-i-Akbar, ‘The Greatest Secret.’ Before Sirr-i-Ak-bar he had written several other books, the most famous of which is Majma ul-Bahrain [‘The Mingling of Two Oceans’], an independent work devoted to discovering the affinities between Vedantic and Sufi perceptions of the Ultimate Truth.

    Correct Option: B

    Dara Shikoh, Emperor Shah Jahan’s son and brother of Aurangzeb, tranlsated the Upanishads into Persian, with the help of several pundits of Banaras. His translation of the Upanishads is appropriately called Sirr-i-Akbar, ‘The Greatest Secret.’ Before Sirr-i-Ak-bar he had written several other books, the most famous of which is Majma ul-Bahrain [‘The Mingling of Two Oceans’], an independent work devoted to discovering the affinities between Vedantic and Sufi perceptions of the Ultimate Truth.


  1. The first Indian Hindi Scholar of the Mughal period was









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    Malik Muhammad Jayasi was an Indian poet who wrote in the Avadhi dialect of Hindi. His most famous work is Padmavat (1540), a poem describing the story of the historic siege of Chittor by Alauddin Khilji in AD 1303, who attacked Chittor after hearing of the beauty of Queen Rani Padmini, the wife of King Rawal Ratan Singh. His other important works are Akhrawat and Akhiri Kalaam.

    Correct Option: A

    Malik Muhammad Jayasi was an Indian poet who wrote in the Avadhi dialect of Hindi. His most famous work is Padmavat (1540), a poem describing the story of the historic siege of Chittor by Alauddin Khilji in AD 1303, who attacked Chittor after hearing of the beauty of Queen Rani Padmini, the wife of King Rawal Ratan Singh. His other important works are Akhrawat and Akhiri Kalaam.



  1. Who among the following was an illiterate?









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    Akbar spent his childhood in the rough terrain of Afghanistan. His early years were spent learning how to hunt, fight and mature into a skillful warrior. He did not find time to read and write and was illiterate. But his illiteracy did not hamper his quest for knowledge and desire to know about new things. Akbar had a huge library and a vast collection of books and scriptures. His courtiers read out the books for him.

    Correct Option: C

    Akbar spent his childhood in the rough terrain of Afghanistan. His early years were spent learning how to hunt, fight and mature into a skillful warrior. He did not find time to read and write and was illiterate. But his illiteracy did not hamper his quest for knowledge and desire to know about new things. Akbar had a huge library and a vast collection of books and scriptures. His courtiers read out the books for him.


  1. The Lodi dynasty was founded by









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    Lodi Dynasty was a Pashtun dynasty that was the last dynasty to rule the Delhi Sultanate. The dynasty founded by Bahlul Lodi ruled from 1451 to 1526. The last ruler of this dynasty, Ibrahim Lodi was defeated and killed by Babur in the first Battle of Panipat on April 20, 1526.

    Correct Option: C

    Lodi Dynasty was a Pashtun dynasty that was the last dynasty to rule the Delhi Sultanate. The dynasty founded by Bahlul Lodi ruled from 1451 to 1526. The last ruler of this dynasty, Ibrahim Lodi was defeated and killed by Babur in the first Battle of Panipat on April 20, 1526.



  1. Arrange the following in chronological order :
    a. Tughlaqs
    b. Lodis
    c. Sayyids
    d. Ilbari Turks
    e. Khiljis









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    The Delhi Sultanate is a term used to cover five short-lived dynasties, Delhi based kingdoms or sultanates, mostly of Turkic and Pashtun (Afghan) origin in medieval India. The sultanates ruled from Delhi between 1206 and 1526, when the last was replaced by the Mughal dynasty. The five dynasties were the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90); the Khilji dynasty (1290–1320); the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414); the Sayyid
    dynasty (1414–51); and the Afghan Lodi dynasty (1451–1526). The Mamluk Dynasty or Slave Dynasty, directed into India by Qutb-ud-din Aibak, a Turkish general of Central Asian birth, was the first of five unrelated dynasties to rule India’s Delhi Sultanate from 1206 to 1290.

    Correct Option: D

    The Delhi Sultanate is a term used to cover five short-lived dynasties, Delhi based kingdoms or sultanates, mostly of Turkic and Pashtun (Afghan) origin in medieval India. The sultanates ruled from Delhi between 1206 and 1526, when the last was replaced by the Mughal dynasty. The five dynasties were the Mamluk dynasty (1206–90); the Khilji dynasty (1290–1320); the Tughlaq dynasty (1320–1414); the Sayyid
    dynasty (1414–51); and the Afghan Lodi dynasty (1451–1526). The Mamluk Dynasty or Slave Dynasty, directed into India by Qutb-ud-din Aibak, a Turkish general of Central Asian birth, was the first of five unrelated dynasties to rule India’s Delhi Sultanate from 1206 to 1290.