COMMON ERRORS


Direction: In the following questions, some parts of the sentences have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of a sentence has an error. The number of that part is your answer. If a sentence is free from error, then your answer is (4), i.e. No error.

  1. Solve the question according to given instruction.
    1. I have been
    2. working in this organization
    3. since three years.
    4. No error

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    for will replace since because – since is used while specifying the starting point. for is used while specifying the amount of time (how long).
    Look at the examples given below :
    She has been dancing since she was 5 years old. She has been dancing for a long time.
    Hence, for three years is the right usage.

    Correct Option: C

    for will replace since because – since is used while specifying the starting point. for is used while specifying the amount of time (how long).
    Look at the examples given below :
    She has been dancing since she was 5 years old. She has been dancing for a long time.
    Hence, for three years is the right usage.


  1. Solve the question according to given instruction.
    1. Unless aid arrives
    2. within the next few weeks
    3. thousands are starving.
    4. No error

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    will starve will replace are starving because – if Conditional Clause is in Simple Present, the Main Clause will be in Simple Future Tense.
    Hence, thousands will starve is the right usage.

    Correct Option: C

    will starve will replace are starving because – if Conditional Clause is in Simple Present, the Main Clause will be in Simple Future Tense.
    Hence, thousands will starve is the right usage.



Direction: In the following questions, some parts of sentences have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of a sentence has an error. The number of that part is the answer. If a sentence is free from error, your answer is (4), i.e. No error.

  1. Solve the question according to given instruction.
    1. No sooner did the peon
    2. ring the bell
    3. the boys left the class.
    4. No error

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    than will be used before the boys because – No sooner ___ than are the correct pair of Conjunctions.
    Hence, than the boys left the class is the right usage.

    Correct Option: C

    than will be used before the boys because – No sooner ___ than are the correct pair of Conjunctions.
    Hence, than the boys left the class is the right usage.


  1. Solve the question according to given instruction.
    1. He asked me
    2. what I am doing
    3. out in the street at that hour
    4. No error

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    am will be replace by was. In Indirect speech, verb changes according to the reporting verb. As the reporting verb is in Past Tense the verb in the reported speech will also be in Past Tense.
    Hence, what I was doing is the right usage

    Correct Option: B

    am will be replace by was. In Indirect speech, verb changes according to the reporting verb. As the reporting verb is in Past Tense the verb in the reported speech will also be in Past Tense.
    Hence, what I was doing is the right usage



  1. Solve the question according to given instruction.
    1. Though the police tried all sorts of methods to illicit
    2. information from the public
    3. they remained silent.
    4. No error

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    elicit will replace illicit
    elicit (Verb) : to get information or a reaction from somebody, often with difficulty
    illicit (Adj.) : not allowed by law; illegal
    Look at the examples given below :
    In the prison, inmates are prohibited from having illicit items such as drugs, alcohol, and weapons. The comedian hoped his jokes would elicit a great deal of laughter from the audience.
    Hence, Though the police tried all sorts of methods to elicit is the right usage.

    Correct Option: A

    elicit will replace illicit
    elicit (Verb) : to get information or a reaction from somebody, often with difficulty
    illicit (Adj.) : not allowed by law; illegal
    Look at the examples given below :
    In the prison, inmates are prohibited from having illicit items such as drugs, alcohol, and weapons. The comedian hoped his jokes would elicit a great deal of laughter from the audience.
    Hence, Though the police tried all sorts of methods to elicit is the right usage.