COMMON ERRORS


  1. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of the sentence has an error. If the sentence is free from error, choose No error.
    I’d like a bike in commuting to work.
    1. I’d like
    2. a bike
    3. in commuting to work
    4. No error

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Here, Infinitive i.e. to commute for work/to work is the right usage.

    Correct Option: C

    Here, Infinitive i.e. to commute for work/to work is the right usage.


  1. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of the sentence has an error. If the sentence is free from error, ‘No error’.
    I always had a fancy towards big luxurious cars.
    1. had a
    2. fancy
    3. towards big
    4. No error

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Habitual action is evident. Hence, Present Tense i.e., have a is the right usage.

    Correct Option: A

    Habitual action is evident. Hence, Present Tense i.e., have a is the right usage.




  1. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of the sentence has an error.
    As I prefer coffee than tea my friends always take the trouble to get me a cup of coffee.
    1. As I prefer
    2. coffee than tea
    3. my friends always take the trouble
    4. to get me a cup of coffee.

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    It is Preposition related error. Prep. – to is used after prefer Hence,coffee (Noun)to tea (Noun) is the right usage.

    Correct Option: B

    It is Preposition related error. Prep. – to is used after prefer Hence,coffee (Noun)to tea (Noun) is the right usage.


  1. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of the sentence has an error. Nowhere is the resulting confusion more evident except in campaign speeches made by different campaigners of the same party.
    1. Nowhere is the resulting confusion
    2. more evident
    3. except in campaign speeches
    4. made by different campaigners of the same party.

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    (1) except/except for : apart from. Here, except/except for campaign speeches is the right usage.

    Correct Option: C

    (1) except/except for : apart from. Here, except/except for campaign speeches is the right usage.



  1. In the following question, some parts of the sentence have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of a sentence has an error.
    The young child singed a very sweet song for the audience.
    1. The young child
    2. singed
    3. a very sweet song
    4. for the audience

  1. View Hint View Answer Discuss in Forum

    Sing⇒Sang (Past)⇒Sung (Past Participle) Here, sang is the right usage.

    Correct Option: B

    Sing⇒Sang (Past)⇒Sung (Past Participle) Here, sang is the right usage.